Legal Ways Out of Debt – How to Avoid 50% of Your Unsecured Debt

All of us dream of bigger houses, a fancy car and for some, even going to big colleges are a dream. Unfortunately not all have the money to realize their dreams. It is for them that the banks have furnished various schemes or loans. By availing these unsecured loans the individuals are able to fulfill their wish. Sometimes what happens is that they might exceed the limit of credit given to them and are not in a position to repay the amount that they have spent. They avoid repaying the money that they owe the banks. The amount to be paid multiplies because of the interest charged and late fee that keeps adding on to the principal amount.

When you are knee deep in debts you might consider various methods of dodging the banks and collection agencies that keep calling, constantly reminding you of the bills you need to pay up. What are the legal ways to get out of debt? How to avoid 50% of your unsecured debt? Debt settlements or debt negotiations is the answer to all your debt related woes. By approaching a debt relief agency you can assure that at least 50% of your debts will be written off by your banks. Debt relief agencies are professionals who have a great deal of experience in dealing with creditors. They will know all the legal proceedings that will have to be followed. Great care has to be taken while choosing a debt relief agency as there are many fraudulent companies out there who are waiting to take advantage of you.

The debt relief agency will prepare a report based on the information collected from you, regarding your current income and fixed expenses. All necessary papers will be prepared that needs to be submitted to the banks. A meeting is called with the banks by the agent and it is up to him to convince them of your inability to pay up the entire amount. How much will waived off as bad debts by the creditors depends solely on the negotiation skills of the agent. An amount will be agreed upon by both the parties which can be paid in lump sum or in installments. So, why compromise your goals in life and let it shrink away in your dreams?

Advertising Compliance – Dodging Bullets

I remember the good old days when I was blissfully ignorant about everything except making the next car deal.
Back in the days when I was a dealership general manager, I couldn’t wait for the next big sale, promotion, mailer, etc, whatever it took to make things happen. I gladly signed up for whatever “Next Big Thing” my boss was willing to pay for. After all, we had to keep the staff pumped up and the customers coming in, right?

Well, since then I’ve learned a thing or two about compliance and now realize that many of the programs we participated in were questionable at best or downright misleading (and thus, illegal) at worst. I never gave those advertisements a second thought because I figured we paid the program vendors a lot of money so they must be legal and proper, right? And even if the ads were improper, the vendor would be responsible, not us, right? Ah, wrong and wrong.

There was one program that we did that still gives me night terrors when I think about it. I was GM at a dealership that was part of a group in California and I got the word from the corporate office that we signed up for a promotion with a company from another state. It went something like this: the company sent out mailers which were simulated newspaper ads with my picture and all kinds of exciting quotes from me about this amazing sale we were putting on. Now the really exciting part was that these ads were mailed to people in hand-addressed envelopes, so they were more likely to open it. When the addressee opened the envelope, he or she found the “newspaper ad” with a Post-it note stuck to it signed by “J”, an apparent friend of theirs who saw the ad and thought they would be interested.

I loved it! I thought this was a great marketing concept. Everyone knows someone with the first initial J, so it had a certain degree of credibility. Of course, a few customers were a bit savvier and called the dealership to express their disgust with our “sleazy tactics”, but I digress.

At any rate, I was excited, the staff was excited, and, not surprisingly, the promotion did quite well. So, what’s the problem?

Well, the ad was “questionable” in all kinds of ways, such as:

• Proclaimed that the dealer “used $23 million from 18 banks to revive the local credit market during this sale” and that we had a “partnership local banks for a special credit and pricing event” – sorry, but we didn’t have any deals with any banks for any amount of money.
• Stated that these “banks” were offering us “preferred terms that our competitors couldn’t match in this market” – yeah, sure…
• 3.9% APR available on certified pre-owned vehicles – too bad we didn’t have any CPO cars…
• Vehicle payments advertised that virtually no one would qualify for: 60 month financing on an 8 year-old car with $29 down and an amount financed of less than $5,000… Good luck with that. (I don’t know, maybe one of those 23 phantom banks that I allegedly hooked up with would have done that kind of a deal?)

As far as I’m concerned, I – and the dealer – dodged a bullet with that ad. The worst part, of course, being the “I” part. My name, my picture and my “quotes” were all over the ad. Was I potentially liable for any violations? Heck yeah!

Advertising is considered deceptive if “members of the public are likely to be deceived” or the advertisement has a “tendency or capacity to mislead the public”. If an ad is deceptive, an advertiser has liability regardless of whether there was intent to deceive. A dealer has the duty to investigate the accuracy of any statements made in advertising. You should never assume that advertising agencies or representatives know all the laws and regulations governing advertising compliance. This is particularly true of companies based in other states, such as internet and direct mail providers. State advertising laws are very stringent and the responsibility for compliance lies with the dealership, not the advertising agency.

Bottom line: Be careful when advertising. If you’re not sure about an advertisement or promotion, it’s a good idea to have an attorney look it over. It’s probably better than trying to dodge those bullets.

Adult Bullying, Tips For Legal Loitering & Other Interesting Book Titles

It all started when my wife was pregnant and we were at Border’s. We were walking by the help desk and I stopped and asked the employee to look up a book title for me. “Excuse me, but I’m looking for a book entitled, “How to NOT be a Dead Beat Dad.” This obviously embarrassed my wife, but I got great enjoyment out of watching the employee type in the ridiculous title in the computer.

I was referred to visit their Family section. I got such a kick out of it, that I make it a habit to ask for interesting sounding titles whenever we head over to the book store. If your like me and find the book store a little stuffy and boring, this may be a good way to add a little excitement to your next visit.

Excuse me, but what section can I find…

“Adult Bullying-Tips for Successful Bullying Late in Life”

“How to Pressure Your Kids into Excellence”

“Puppy Mills-How to dodge regulations and the ASPCA”

“Road Rage Techniques and Success Stories”

“Why it’s not OK to cry” A Children’s Book

“The Benefits of Smoking Cigarettes”

“I have my Art History Degree, now what the heck do I do?”

“Legal Loitering”

“How to approach your wife when you just got fired for obsessively looking at internet porn on company time”

“Organ Harvesting For Beginners”

“6 ways to sneak book store books into the restroom”

“Oops I slipped. Who can I sue and for how much money?”